Welcome to SuperDARN!
SuperDARN stands for Super Dual Auroral Radar Network. The network consists of more than 30 low-power HF radars that look into Earth's upper atmosphere beginning at mid-latitudes and extending into the polar regions. The radars operate continuously and observe the motion of charged particles (plasma) in the ionosphere and other effects that provide scientists with information on Earth's space environment. The knowledge gained from this work provides insight into space weather hazards including radiation exposure for high-altitude travelers and disruptions to communication networks, navigation systems (GPS), and electrical power grids.

The SuperDARN Research Group at Virginia Tech (VT) collaborates with an international community of scientists and engineers to operate radars and share data. The VT Group operates five radars. For a summary of the radars and their affiliations, visit the Radar Maps/Tables/Links web page.

U.S. SuperDARN Collaboration
The U.S. component of SuperDARN is funded by the National Science Foundation under the Space Weather Research (SWR) Program as a collaboration between Virginia Tech (lead institution), Dartmouth College, University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF), and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL). Click logos for access to the web sites of the U.S. SuperDARN partners.




Program Available for the 2015 SuperDARN Workshop at Leicester, UK

By: miker  on: Tue., May 12, 2015 08:01 AM EDT  (1575 Reads)
The 2015 SuperDARN Workshop will be held in Leicester, UK, June 1-5, 2015. More than 70 scientists, students, and engineers will gather to discuss radar operations and shared research interests. The Workshop is being hosted by the University of Leicester SuperDARN research group, Prof. Mark Lester, PI. The workshop program has been posted and recently revised at
https://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/physics/research/rspp/sd/superdarn-2015/sd2015(external link)
Accommodation at College Court can be purchased when registering for the meeting.

Pictured: Fielding Johnson Building of the University of Leicester, built in 1837.

Discussion of Radar modes for the NASA MMS Satellite mission

By: miker  on: Sat., May 09, 2015 09:36 PM EDT  (1576 Reads)
The NASA Magnetospheric Multiscale mission (MMS) launched as scheduled on March 12, 2015 at 10:44 EDT from Cape Canaveral carried by a United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket.

Quoting from the NASA MMS website at http://mms.gsfc.nasa.gov/(external link) : 'The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission is a Solar Terrestrial Probes mission comprising four identically instrumented spacecraft that will use Earth’s magnetosphere as a laboratory to study the microphysics of three fundamental plasma processes: magnetic reconnection, energetic particle acceleration, and turbulence.'

The science phase of the mission is scheduled to begin in September. SuperDARN is planning to operate in supporting modes.

NOAA DSCOVR satellite on its way to L1 libration point

By: miker  on: Fri., Mar. 27, 2015 10:33 AM EDT  (929 Reads)
The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) is scheduled to begin operations this summer giving early warning of solar storms. It was launched from Cape Canaveral on February 11, 2015. Essentially, it will replace the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite (in operation at L1 since the late 1990s) with upgraded measurement capabilities.

An EOS Earth & Space Science News on-line article by Delores Knipp and Douglas Biesecker describes the mission:

https://eos.org/project-updates/changing-of-the-guard-satellite-will-warn-earth-of-solar-storms(external link)
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Fort Hays Antenna Array Trip - August 2015

By: ksterne  on: Fri., Aug. 28, 2015 01:05 PM EDT  (6 Reads)
After a decrease in sensitivity on the Fort Hays radars, Kevin Sterne and Mike Ruohoniemi made a trip the week of August 16th to the 22nd 2015 to Hays, KS in order to assess parts needing repairs and perform what repairs could be completed. In the weeks prior to this trip, FHSU student intern Ryan White reported a few wires hanging down along the antenna arrays as well as problems with the antennas. Also, in the weeks or up to a month before the trip, one of the computers at the site began locking up.

Quick trip to Blackstone to install transmitters

By: ksterne  on: Fri., Apr. 10, 2015 09:44 AM EDT  (949 Reads)
A quick day trip was made by Kevin Sterne and Deven Chheda on March 27th, 2015 in order to install some repaired transmitters and give a look at the site to see how things were going. This trip was originally planned after an extended network outage as well as a fear that one of the computers at the site had gone bad. However, in the days leading up to the trip the network connection as well as the issue with the computer were corrected. This left us with smaller but also important issues to complete during this trip. One of these was to install two of the four transmitters that were being worked on in the Blacksburg lab. These two had been repaired and were ready to be installed back at the site. As well, a range calibration was performed during this trip as it was noticed that sometime in mid-September, the radar's range appeared to be off. As well, this would be Deven's first trip to a SuperDARN site, so the operations and systems were explained to Deven.
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